The Rise Of Women In Global Politics

The Rise Of Women In Global Politics

Lately women have been making strides in the field of politics and in the bodies of global governance. This includes the appointment of Theresa May as successor of David Cameron, the unending rule of German Chancellor Merkel, the rise of Hillary Clinton in the US presidential race and the presence of women on the shortlist for the next UN Secretary-General. These upcoming women will be welcomed by some influential women who are already part of the elite leadership, including the South Korean President Park Geun-hye, Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, and International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde.

As leaders, women bring a distinctive approach to issues of war and peace, trade, policing and public welfare. History shows that women are also prone to embrace masculine traits in crisis situations, as did Golda Meir, Margaret Thatcher and Indira Gandhi. Research suggests that once women attain ‘critical mass’, which is generally accepted as between 20 and 30 percent, within institutions and decision-making bodies, their influence grows visibly – according to Rosabeth Moss Kanter, a Harvard Business School professor, when women exceed one-third of a group they can form coalitions, provide mutual support and reshape the group’s overall culture. Kanter argues that the potential presence of a critical mass, a combination of women, has the power to reformulate certain aspects of global business.

Women leaders are rising to power in circumstances full of crisis. The rise of Theresa May as successor of Cameron is an example of commitment of women leadership. When male leaders fled the consequences followed by Brexit, she stood firmly. The UN is not facing an impending crisis, but its focus towards world events has seen a downward trend. The internal situation demands a new and vibrant leadership that may usher it again to the original aims and objectives. Such can be done, by a woman leader who ought to be more committed and enthusiastic. Female leadership is more prone to cooperation and form vibrant coalitions which culminate into policies and their implementation. In teamwork, women leadership achieves greater confidence, flexibility and accountability, which cannot be attained in other working environments. They are more open and amenable to collaboration as they are inclined to downplay their abilities and enhance those of their counterparts, who are not as cooperative in working relationships and prefer hierarchy. Such genuine spirit of cooperation among women is innate and they tend to be more empathetic. Women identify themselves with marginalized counties and down-trodden people. The rising women leadership may cope with inconveniences in security summits and international conferences. If a bunch of female leaders prove themselves, even to some extent, to be better at communicating, collaborating and interacting with each other, the international outcomes will be far greater. A group of them will put welfare and concerns of women more central to global policy making. The existence of a critical mass of women leadership at the global level can promote the appointments of more female ambassadors and defense and foreign ministers. The United Nations and many heads of state have nominated women envoys to mediate major global conflicts. At the same time, women diplomats have been selected by some states in hopes of strengthening their relationship with key states and institutions.

 

The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of CourtingTheLaw.com or any other organization with which he might be associated.

Aijaz Hussain

The writer holds a Masters degree in Political Science from Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad and is an intern at Courting The Law. He has keen interest in international law, constitutional law and international politics and has also pursued various online courses on law, government and politics, including ‘Crime, Justice and Society’ from the University of Sheffield and ‘Religion and Conflict’ from the University of Groningen, Netherlands.



Related posts

One Comment;

  1. Surender Singh said:

    I will just stick to the point.

    1. I failed to stop myself from tempting to smell “Patronizing and Patriarchal attitude” and selection of words in your article beginning from “Such can be done, by a woman leader who ought to be more committed and enthusiastic. Female leadership is more prone to cooperation and form vibrant coalitions which culminate into policies and their implementation. In teamwork, women leadership achieves greater confidence, flexibility and accountability, which cannot be attained in other working environments. They are more open and amenable to collaboration as they are inclined to downplay their abilities and enhance those of their counterparts, who are not as cooperative in working relationships and prefer hierarchy. Such genuine spirit of cooperation among women is innate and they tend to be more empathetic. Women identify themselves with marginalized counties and down-trodden people. The rising women leadership may cope with inconveniences in security summits and international conferences. If a bunch of female leaders prove themselves, even to some extent, to be better at communicating, collaborating and interacting with each other, the international outcomes will be far greater. A group of them will put welfare and concerns of women more central to global policy making. The existence of a critical mass of women leadership at the global level can promote the appointments of more female ambassadors and defense and foreign ministers. The United Nations and many heads of state have nominated women envoys to mediate major global conflicts. At the same time, women diplomats have been selected by some states in hopes of strengthening their relationship with key states and institutions.”

    2. You can really work on substantiating your argument more than assuming the relationship between two arguments or just jumping a generalization. “Research suggests that once women attain critical mass” – Which research, please provide a link or source, “fled the consequences ” – I am not such adjective is required at all.

Comments are closed.